Occupy Tucson doesn’t occupy a point - The Explorer: Editorials

Occupy Tucson doesn’t occupy a point

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Posted: Wednesday, December 7, 2011 4:00 am

If you’ve been downtown recently you will find yourself in the midst of a city of tents with a growing population of people participating in the nationwide, Occupy Wall Street movement.

After seeing the tent city for myself, and hearing what a group of the protestors had to say to visiting Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, I left wondering what exactly is the point of Occupy Wall Street, or in this case, Occupy Tucson?

While Arpaio draws controversy, and seemed to enjoy arguing, or agitating, the group of protestors, I stood there wondering what exactly they were mad it? Did Arpaio cause the problems on Wall Street? Aren’t the nation’s economic problems what the so-called 99 percent are taking on the homeless image for?

Were they mad at Arpaio because he caused it? Did Arpaio get away from his Wyatt Earp approach to law enforcement in order to cause a recession?

After doing some checking, I found one statement that says the protests are against social and economic inequality, high unemployment, greed, as well as corruption, and the undue influence of corporations – particularly those in the financial services sector.

Well, Tucson is a long way from Wall Street, and with such a broad range of issues to be mad at, it shows these dedicated protestors can stay in those tents forever, despite the mounting number of citations and high number of America’s population questioning if they are sending any kind of productive message whatsoever.

I’m all for freedom of speech, believe me, I disagree with plenty of things people have to say in today’s world, but I usually respect it. However, Occupy Tucson, Occupy Wall Street, or Occupy (insert city, town or county here) just doesn’t make any sense.

While Arpaio draws plenty of accusations with his approach to enforcing the law, I really got the feeling from the Occupy Tucson group that they were just bored, and wanted something or someone to do their “mic check,” routine on. Also, they loved the idea of having an audience, which was primarily just a small group of media there to watch.

Outside these tents, what appears to be a clothesline also has signs and messages pinned up. One of those was a piece of a cardboard box that said “Rosa Parks.” I’m sorry, but she stood up for her right to sit on a bus, and is an American icon. Your message, or reason for protesting, pales in comparison.

After returning from Arpaio’s press conference, I logged into Facebook, and quickly found Occupy Tucson is connected.

Of course the Facebook page was more dedicated to asking people for handouts than they were really explaining what they are fighting against here in Tucson.

They asked for kitchen items such as forks and spoons, they asked for washcloths, and so many other items that you use at home.

So, here is a suggestion, do the senseless protesting during the day or on weekends, and go home at night. Stop making our town look like we have a homeless problem. The actual homeless people worry us enough.

One of the protestors looked so bad I felt like giving them a hand out, or directing them to a nearby shelter.

Most of America is upset about the economy, most of America is upset that many of these banks still gave bonuses to the CEOs who caused the recession, and many of us are tired of the seemingly endless recession tunnel we appear to be in.

However, many of us still do our talking, or protesting if you will, the old fashion way. We get off our butts, we go to the polls and we vote. They aren’t all winners, but that’s what the next election is for.

Changes don’t happen from a message from a dirty person inside a tent, they come from voting, being good citizens and making a difference.

—Thelma Grimes

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5 comments:

  • jdaz78 posted at 3:28 pm on Tue, Dec 20, 2011.

    jdaz78 Posts: 2

    Lack of a message, mis-guided anger, politicians tripping over themselves at the beginning to be involved, ACORN involvement, etc.

    All reasons the whole OWS thing is really a joke. They say they represent the 99%, unfortunately they represent the 1%.

    How do you define economic fairness?
    Who decides how much more some people should pay in taxes?
    Isn't "fairness" ensuring that everyone then pays taxes? Why direct your anger at Wall Street? Why not the politicians who put the rules in place that the Wall Street folks play by? (Shoot the person making the bribe or the one taking it?)

    At least the Tea Party had a message that they rallied behind. Agree with them or not, you know what they stand for.

     
  • Don posted at 6:45 am on Sat, Dec 10, 2011.

    Don Posts: 34

    I am far more impressed with the well presented article than the band of nomadic characters illegally camping in Tucson or whereever. It's nothing more than another fad that is and will continue to fade into clutter.

    Economic fairness is found at the end of a successful hunt for a job, not in some tent.

     
  • Travaler posted at 1:33 am on Fri, Dec 9, 2011.

    Travaler Posts: 1

    I went to one of the Tucson OWS planing deminstrations, as well as some of the tea party events and honestly i didnt see much planing for what they want to do from either one.

    I dont think they really need a clear and defined platform at first, as long as they are there working and defining what their goals are. At the down town demanstration the tucson Libertarain VP got shouted down and so did s demacrat offfical. and ive seen that happen nation wide.

    i dont feel its too constructive to the overall gathering of ideals for a better union.

     
  • Bob Voso posted at 11:15 am on Thu, Dec 8, 2011.

    Bob Voso Posts: 1


    When the majority of a society senses that the status quo is unjust and dehumanizing, and that it is immoral to help people adjust to it, you will have change.

    Parties which are interested in maintaining the status quo, which have a stake in oppression and exploitation, will naturally try to find ways to denigrate or mock the movement.

    It is not subversive to comment on or act on the social and economic conditions that shape people’s lives.

    When oppressive authorities react violently to peaceful resistance, their violence validates their illegitimacy. Resistance to these authorities becomes more determined and actually energizes the opposition.

    The Occupy movement is a demand for economic fairness—a frightening prospect for the elite or their lackeys. The human need for fairness, social justice, freedom, and autonomy are universal. Anyone who would deny this is in denial of their own situation.

     
  • JamVee posted at 6:46 am on Wed, Dec 7, 2011.

    JamVee Posts: 7

    The OWS movement objects to the "1 Percenters". Well, approx. 1% of the protesters have a reasonable, and well thought out, cause to represent. The rest of them seem to be there in order to attend the biggest "Tailgater Party" ever. For them, it's a social event, like camping out in Target's parking lot half the night, waiting for the doors to open for the Black Friday "Event".

     

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