Letters - The Explorer: Letters To Editor

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Letters to the editor published in the January 25, 2012, edition of The Explorer.

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Posted: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 4:00 am

Feud is laughable and insulting

It was both laughable and insulting to their constituents for State Sen. Al Melvin and State Rep. Vic Williams to conduct an adolescent spat in the pages of this newspaper.

Both these gentlemen should know that it is their solemn responsibility to engage in more relevant work than insulting each other and trying to prove who is the more prominent ideologue.

Given the serious work that must be taken on by our legislators, we should all be appalled by the fact that two elected officials think it is OK to waste everyone’s time engaging in a public feud.

The fact is that Melvin and Williams have usually voted the same way since they have been elected, and they often act in ways that are not in our interest. Both of them have taken millions away from our public schools, making the jobs of local educators even more challenging.

Both of them have diverted revenue from local governments, while piling more mandates on them, in pursuit of a “balanced” state budget. Both of them are more likely to vote the way the Maricopa County-based leadership of the Legislature wants them to vote, even if those marching orders fly in the face of the needs of Southern Arizonans.

Williams and Melvin both showed their true colors last week in The Explorer. Neither of them represents us well and they never have. Let’s remember this defining moment when we vote in November, along with all the anti-Pima County votes both of them has cast.

Rex Scott, Tucson


Scarbro presents puzzling statements

In Jan. 11 issue of The Explorer, Ron Scarbro made a number of puzzling statements about who he would like to have as the next President. While we all are entitled to our own opinions and beliefs, we are not entitled to own personal set of facts.

First, he talks about how a candidate must have a commitment to the security of America. I wonder if Mr. Scabro knows who was President and Vice President on Sept. 11.

Let me give Mr. Scarbro a hint, it wasn’t President Obama.

And, who gave two officials of our intelligence agencies, the FBI and the CIA, the Medal of Freedom award for their work in keeping us safe from Sept. 11, it wasn’t President Obama. What President’s Treasury Secretary came up with the idea of TARP, it wasn’t President Obama.

Now to the biggest error that Mr. Scabro made in referring to the The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, signed into law on March 23, 2010 by President Obama, as Obama Care. I know people don’t like the idea of everyone in this country having access to affordable care, but calling an apple an orange does not make it so. If Mr. Scarbro wants to make a misstatement about the Affordable Care Act he then should refer to Social Security as Roosevelt Care, Medicare as Johnson Care, and the Medicare prescription drug program as Bush care. And while talking about the prescription drug program, maybe Mr. Scarbro can tell us, why Rep. Billy Tauzin from Louisiana, who was Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, was able to put in the bill that the Federal Government could not negotiate with Ph.R.M.A. for lower drug prices. Maybe he could also explain why Rep. Tauzin resigned his seat after the bill was signed, and went to work for the Pharmaceutical industry.

I realize that most people don¹t want to be confused by the facts, but when you are writing for the press or on public airwaves you should make sure of your facts.

Clyde Steele, SaddleBrooke

 


 

Not going to drink the RTA Kool-Aid

I really wish you folks would stop drinking the RTA Kool-Aid and start reporting the whole truth about what RTA projects are really costing the taxpayers.

It’s easy to read press releases by corrupt government officials who have been defrauding the public, etc., since day one. Your job should be to find out what’s really going on and expose this corruption. You seem to act as if you’re bought and paid for by these corrupt officials when you go along with whatever they say without doing any independent facts checking.

Your latest report(s) on the Streetcar Project/Cushing Street Bridge are false and misleading to say the least. According to the City of Tucson website, the Cushing Street Bridge will cost about $15 million, and the total cost of the Streetcar over 20 years will be over $400 million.

Basically, we the taxpayers will be paying about $50 per passenger, per trip over the next 20 years in subsidies; a taxi cab from UMC to O’Malley’s would cost $9 per person including tip.  A huge waste of money in today’s (and any day’s) environment.

And, as a side note, the Cushing Street Bridge wasn’t approved by the Feds until well after the RTA election. Never told to voters.

This is just one big example of poor reporting related to RTA projects.

 

Tom Sander

 


 

Williams and Melvin acted childishly

I found “A Challange to Senator Al Melvin” and “Senator Melvin Responds” to be very childish.  Each must have a pool in their backyard, and as Narcissus, looked into the pool and fell in love with their reflection. 

They are filled with self-importance and believe they have an audience that cares.  Al Melvin is full of bluster and is constantly posturing to promote an agenda that goes nowhere in the senate. 

As for Vic, well,  he is concerned with his reputation more than anything else.  It is obvious he is intent upon protecting his political future and offers nothing to his constituents. 

They act like junior high school bullies.  And, in the parlance of junior high - Vic and Al, you ain’t all that!

 

Jon Langione, Oro Valley

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