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Posted: Wednesday, July 4, 2012 4:00 am | Updated: 12:07 pm, Wed Jul 4, 2012.

Consider the source

In a recent letter sent to the editor of this publication, Conny Culver, unfortunately a resident of Oro Valley, questioned the advisability of some items on the upcoming Town Council consent agenda. As it turns out, while a sitting member of the Town Council, Ms. Culver had no objections to some of the exact same items being on the consent agenda and in fact voted in favor of like items.

In addition to her continued outpouring of misinformation and inaccurate statements, Ms. Culver, among others to include Marana Councilwoman Ziegler, County Supervisor Candidate Miller, were so disruptive and disrespectful to the process and those in attendance, that the Oro Valley Mayor had to interrupt the June 20, 2012 Town Council meeting and ask that they depart the building if their conduct continued. They departed.

This display by Ms. Culver is nothing new or out of the ordinary. Her conduct as a sitting Councilwoman was extremely questionable and subject to constant scrutiny. As an example, Ms. Culver was questioned about eating at a Ruth’s Chris Steak House while on a Town  business trip to Washington DC. The cost far beyond her per diem food allowance. Her explanation was that it was the only restaurant open.

I would hope that on a go forward basis local residents consider the source when anything is presented by Ms. Culver. She is, in my opinion, far more harmful than helpful, in the continued evolution of our great community.

Don Cox 

 

Immigration - What’s the “Right Thing To Do?”

Do most Americans know what U.S. Immigration numbers really are? I looked it up and here it is. To become a Naturalized American Citizen you must first become a legal resident. Legal residents obtain Green Cards and are therefore authorized to work, pay taxes and have many other privileges of legal residency like drivers licenses. According to Homeland Security reports in 2011 the U.S. approved 1,062,000; in 2010, 1,042,000, and; 2009, 1,130,000. This is a substantial number of legal residents approved each year. The USA welcomes more immigrants than any other country.

These legal residents are made up of several classes of immigrants. The first group is close family members of American citizens, like parents, siblings or spouses. The second group is the “quota” immigrants from all over the world who have been patiently waiting in line for a “quota” slot for their country to come to America. The third group is generally immigrants granted asylum for humanitarian or political reasons.

Legal residents are then “in line” to become Naturalized American Citizens after they have lived here for five continuous years. They don’t have to become citizens, but over half do. Again, Homeland Security reports that in 2011 694,000 were sworn in as new American Citizens. In 2010 it was 619,000 and in 2009 it was 743,000. 

The Pew Hispanic Center reported that in 2010 there were 11.2 Million illegal immigrants in the U.S., and that 58 percent of them were from Mexico. In 2011 Homeland Security deported 396,909 illegal immigrants, and in 2010, 393,862. This barely keeps pace with the number of new illegal immigrants entering the country. At the current deportation numbers it would take between 25 and 30 years to deport all illegal immigrants. In 1986, President Reagan granted amnesty to 2.9 Million illegal immigrants under a policy, which was to finally gain control of our borders. He later said this was one of the greatest mistakes he had made because the supposed fixes were never made.

Every sovereign nation has the right and obligation to maintain and protect its borders. It has the right to determine who may enter the country and for how long. It may also determine who may become a citizen and the conditions for that privilege. Our Immigration Laws have been written by the U.S. Congress which represents all of the American people. The statistics you have seen above are the result of those laws. Can they be changed? Of course they can but when they are it will be based on a vote representing all of us American Citizens including all those newly minted Naturalized Americans.

Alex De La Garza,

Oro Valley

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