This week in Arizona history - Tucson Local Media: Pima Pinal

This week in Arizona history

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Posted: Tuesday, May 27, 2008 11:00 pm | Updated: 8:03 am, Thu Mar 24, 2011.

On Wednesday, May 28, 1909, two bankers who wrecked the First National Bank in Bisbee were given the minimum sentence of five years in prison.

On this date in 1910, the Pima County Board of Supervisors offered $500 for the arrest and conviction of the killers of stage line operator and rancher Oscar Buckalew.

On this date in 1910, Red Springs, a community located eight miles north of Globe and considered a suburb of Miami, was practically wiped out by fire which destroyed 19 of the 23 houses in town.

On this date in 1912, Executive Order 1538 set aside the Ak Chin Reservation for the Maricopa Indians.

On this date in 1918, Matthew B. River, a Pima Indian, became the first Arizonan to be killed in action in World War I. He died in Catigny, France as a member of Company K, 28th Infantry.

Thursday, May 29

On this date in 1856, Camp Moore in the Sonoita Valley was renamed Fort Buchanan.

On this date in 1873, a troop of the 5th Cavalry established a camp on the San Carlos River near Gila. It became the headquarters for the military government of the San Carlos Indian Agency.

Friday, May 30

On this date in 1864, a group of residents along Granite Creek met and established the town of Prescott, named after historian William Hickling Prescott.

On this date in 1910, President William Howard Taft signed Proclamation 1043, establishing Rainbow Bridge National Monument.

On this date in 1910, Richard Gird, partner of Ed and Al Schiefflin in the founding of Tombstone, and known in later years as the “father of the California beet sugar industry,” died.

Saturday, May 31

On this date in 1910, the Maricopa Reservation was quarantined because of an outbreak of whooping cough and measles.

On this date in 1923, Pipe Spring, a Mormon settlement, fort and site of the first telegraph station in Arizona territory, was made a National Monument.

On this date in 1929, Lady Mary Heath, British aviatrix, stopped in Yuma during her aerial tour of the United States.

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