This week in Arizona history - Tucson Local Media: Pima Pinal

This week in Arizona history

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Posted: Tuesday, September 2, 2008 11:00 pm | Updated: 8:03 am, Thu Mar 24, 2011.

On Wednesday, Sept. 3, 1877, Ed Schieffelin recorded his claim to the “Tombstone Mine” in the Territorial courthouse in Tucson.

On this date in 1929, George Truman, state senator from Pinal County, died in San Francisco. Truman had been a Rough Rider, deputy sheriff, assessor, treasurer and member of the Board of Supervisors for Pinal County.

On this date in 1934, a crowd of 10,000 persons visited Chiricahua National Monument to witness ceremonies opening the new scenic highway through the Wonderland of Rocks.

Thursday, Sept. 4

On this date in 1857, Lt. Edward Fitzgerald Beale arrived at the Colorado River approximately 125 miles above Needles after surveying a wagon road along the 35th parallel from Fort Defiance. Beale experimented with the use of camels on his expedition.

On this date in 1886, the Geronimo surrender conference was held in Skeleton Canyon near the present city of Douglas.

On this date in 1921, August Ealey, a miner working a silver claim near Redington, reported finding a “burial ground of a race of giants.”

On this date in 1924, the first Arizona Indian cast his ballot under the provisions of an act of Congress granting citizenship to American Indians.

Friday, Sept. 5

On this date in 1865, Sonora Gov. Ingacia Pesqueira crossed the border to elude capture by Imperialist troops. He made his headquarters at Tubac, which became the capitol of Sonora for some months thereafter.

Saturday, Sept. 6

On this date in 1891, the city of Tucson sprinkled 17,000 gallons of water daily on downtown streets to settle the dust.

On this date in 1898, a tornado unroofed several homes in Casa Grande, causing one death.

On this date in 1911, a fire destroyed one wing of the state asylum in Phoenix. The militia was called out to evacuate and guard 160 patients.

On this date in 1911, the Inspector of Weights and Measures found that 30 out of 33 scales in Tucson were giving short weight.

On this date in 1932, the Northern Arizona State Teachers College in Flagstaff decided to accept hay, potatoes, eggs, oats or anything else man could eat in lieu of cash from students for room and board and books.

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