The Explorer: Oro Valley

Oro Valley

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  • Riverfront Park soccer fields to be closed through Oct. 18

    Soccer fields at Riverfront Park in Oro Valley will be closed Oct. 6 through Oct. 18, for over-seeding, which provides high-quality turf surfaces on high-traffic areas. The best time to perform this process is during the fall months, when temperatures are ideal and competing weeds are at a minimum. Please note that the field lights will not be turned on in the evening during this time.Club teams and user groups have been notified of the closure so they can choose alternate locations or reschedule practices and games during this time. 

  • Oro Valley’s National Night Out – Oct. 17

    The Oro Valley Police Department would like to invite the public to its annual National Night Out.  Since 1983, this special crime prevention event has been held by communities across the United States focusing on safety. There will be exhibits and demonstrations along with music, prizes and food.  Parents and children will learn about safety in regards to water, internet, poison, drugs and much more. Golder Ranch Fire District and others will also be at the event. The event is being held at the Target Shopping Center at 10555 N. Oracle Road from 6 to 9 p.m. on Oct. 17. 

  • Call for nominations: 2014 Volunteers of the Year

    The Town of Oro Valley is now accepting nominations for the 2014 Volunteers of the Year. Nominees should embody the spirit of volunteerism by going above and beyond the call of duty in an effort to better our community. One man and one woman will be selected based on the outstanding nature of their volunteer efforts and will be recognized at the annual Volunteer Appreciation Reception on Dec.11, 6 to 8 p.m. at the Hilton El Conquistador Golf and Tennis Resort.Nominations are open to anyone who has volunteered for a Town-sponsored project, program, department, committee, etc. Serving on a Town board or commission certainly meets that criterion, but is not a requirement for nomination.Nominations must be received by Friday, Oct. 31.Nominating is simple! Just submit a nomination letter as well as a supporting letter from a second individual to Misti Nowak, Town of Oro Valley communications administrator.Nominations may be hand-delivered to Town Hall, or submitted by email or postal mail. Submissions received after October 31 will not be considered. Both letters of support must be submitted together.Hand delivery

  • Mama’s Hawaiian BBQ shows gratitude to law enforcement

    Mama’s Hawaiian BBQ wants to show appreciation to all law enforcement personnel during the 4th Annual Thank-A-Cop event. Mama’s Thank-A-Cop event will run Oct. 22 from opening until closing at all locations.  If you are a law enforcement professional, stop by any of our three locations to enjoy a free meal. Last year, Mama’s served 183 free meals to police officers.  This year we hope to more than double that.   “Mama’s is proud to support local law enforcement. We want to give back to those who protect and serve our community,” said Sam Alboy, Mama’s owner.  Mama’s Hawaiian BBQ was started in 2010. Mama’s menu features traditional Hawaiian plate lunches and dinners, homemade desserts, and daily specials. Mama’s Hawaiian BBQ has three locations in the Tucson area.  Mama’s Hawaiian BBQ can also cater any event, no matter the size.  

  • Council incorporates 39 acres

    During the Oct. 1 Oro Valley Town Council meeting, mayor and council incorporated a new 39-acre property and rezoned it, amended the town code for elections, and approved the programming components for Naranja Park.The area rezoned is a lot north of Moore Road between Yellow Orchid Drive and Mystic View Place. It is now part of the Rancho Vistoso Planned Area Development and is zoned for medium density residential.During the review process, the development was changed from originally having 105 lots to 75 lots, with an average size of 8,750 square feet per lot.In other council business, Arizona legislation has changed how calculations are done with declaring someone elected in the primary races. Without the voting to make the permanent change, Oro Valley Town Attorney Kelly Schwab said the town would have to make changes each election cycle.She cited the fact that the town used to hold its elections in March and May, but are now mandated by the state to hold its elections in August and November.“This ordinance would clean up some conflicts in our code with the state statutes,” Schwab said.

  • Town of Oro Valley improves online application process for Boards and Commissions

    The application and appointment process for Boards and Commissions in the Town of Oro Valley is now online, improving convenience and efficiency for residents interested in serving on a board. Within a few clicks, citizens can easily visit the town’s website, review vacant positions, submit their application and receive correspondence on the status of their application. By moving the process online, the Town of Oro Valley is aiming to significantly improve the reach and impact of board recruitment. In addition, the town hopes the new technology will reduce the time and resources currently required for appointment management.The following Boards and Commissions currently have vacancies:• Parks and Recreation Advisory Board.• Planning and Zoning Commission.• Stormwater Utility Commission

  • Oro Valley Police Reports

    Oro Valley Police dept.On Monday, Sept. 20, at about 8:45 p.m., Oro Valley police received a report of a reckless driver who was last seen speeding, weaving and drinking from a cocktail glass. Police were able to find the car and safely stopped the driver who showed numerous signs of being under the influence of alcohol. After being given field sobriety tests and giving a positive reading of .201 on a preliminary breath test, the man was arrested for DUI impaired to the slightest degree, DUI with a BAC more than .08, failure to maintain a lane, improper position right turn and for having an open container in the vehicle. He was transported to and booked into the Pima County Adult Detention Center.On Wednesday, Sept. 17, at 5:48 p.m., Oro Valley police spoke to a man on the phone about some stolen golf clubs. The man said sometime between 8 and 8:45 p.m. the previous day his bag of golf clubs was taken from his golf cart while the cart was parked at 1335 W. Lambert Lane, by Noble Hops. He said the bag, clubs and a GPS tracker were valued at about $3,500.

  • Call for nominations: Volunteers of the Year

    The Town of Oro Valley is now accepting nominations for the 2014 Volunteers of the Year. Nominees should embody the spirit of volunteerism by going above and beyond the call of duty in an effort to better our community. One man and one woman will be selected based on the outstanding nature of their volunteer efforts and will be recognized at the annual Volunteer Appreciation Reception on Dec. 11, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Hilton El Conquistador Golf and Tennis Resort.Nominations are open to anyone who has volunteered for a Town-sponsored project, program, department, committee, etc. Serving on a Town board or commission certainly meets that criterion, but is not a requirement for nomination. Nominations must be received by Friday, Oct. 31. Nominating is simple. Just submit a nomination letter as well as a supporting letter from a second individual to Misti Nowak, Town of Oro Valley communications administrator.Nominations may be hand-delivered or postal mailed to Oro Valley Town Hall, 11000 N. La Cañada Dr., Attn. Misti Nowak, or submitted by email to mnowak@orovalleyaz.gov.Submissions received after October 31 will not be considered. Both letters of support must be submitted together.

  • Northwest sixth-grader donates all of her hair to Locks of Love

    The minimum requirement for a hair donation to Locks of Love is 10 inches. But when 11-year-old Jazzmin Juerta saw a picture of a bald 3-year-old in a St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital advertisement, she decided to donate a bit more than the minimum.“I said, ‘Mom, I’m going to donate my hair,’” Jazzmin recounted. “She started telling me I could cut it to my shoulders, my ears, or like really short. I said, ‘Nope, I am going to do it all the way, all the way. Because mine will grow back.’”Feeling it was going to be an impulsive act, Jazzmin’s mom Michelle decided to let her daughter think about it for a few days, all the while thinking she would either forget about it or decide to cut her hair to a longer length. She also made note to Jazzmin that kids don’t always understand what is happening or why someone would shave their head.She warned her daughter that kids could be mean, make fun of her and tease her. But that didn’t deter the Coronado K-8 School sixth-grader.“She said, Mom, if they make fun of me, they can make fun of me. They don’t need to be my friends or stand by me. I am going to do this for somebody,’” Michelle explained.

  • Oro Valley, Marana to pay more for Pima Animal Care Center

    Pima County Administrator Chuck Huckelberry is giving an ultimatum to municipalities that are seeing rising costs related to the Pima Animal Care Center (PACC): pay for the increases or see animals taken or received from that jurisdiction euthanized.In a Sept. 23 memo, Huckelberry said some area governments have complained of spiking costs that have come as a result of the county’s continued efforts to move toward a non-euthanasia policy and to increase spay and neutering.As an option to reduce costs, Huckelberry’s memo says such municipalities should be given the option of adopting a euthanasia policy, though he recommended to the Board of Supervisors that such a practice not be employed in the county.“Choosing a euthanasia policy would allow the municipality to avoid the spay/neuter fees embedded in our operating costs,” Huckelberry wrote. “In addition, kennel space requirements would be reduced, as would medical care expenses, thereby reducing their costs.”Huckelberry added that, “If the municipality chooses this option, I would ask they train one or more of their staff in euthanasia practices, as I do not desire to place on our staff the increased emotional burden of carrying out additional euthanasia.”Huckelberry goes on to suggest a third option in which municipalities operate their own independent animal care facilities.

  • Oro Valley elementary school to be completed in 2016

    The final venture on Amphitheater Public Schools’ bond project list is a new Oro Valley elementary school.It won’t be ready for students  until 2016, but district officials are headlong into preparations.Curriculum planning will continue throughout this school year for the as-yet unnamed school, which will focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (or STEM) disciplines, said Associate Superintendent Monica Nelson. The school will be all-open enrollment, meaning it will have no neighborhood attendance boundaries. It is open to students from within and outside Amphi school district. Nelson said the reasons for a STEM-focused school are numerous: many Amphi parents work in the local technology sector, STEM courses at the middle and high schools are popular, and educators know that there’s a surfeit of high-tech jobs going unfilled right now for lack of qualified applicants.“And we know that as we’re looking ahead into the future that more and more of the jobs that are being created will require students to have a strong background in science, technology engineering and math activities that will prepare them for those kind of jobs,” she said. “So that’s the emphasis that we’re putting into this.”Currently, committees made up of district administrators and educators, along with residents of the future school’s neighborhood and representatives from the Pima County School Superintendent’s Office, Ventana and Honeywell are collaborating on what the school will teach and how it will look. The district is also considering a transportation plan that will have students gathering at specific stops for busing into the school to mitigate traffic around the campus, which will be situated in a residential area.

  • Oro Valley Police Reports

    Oro Valley Police DepartmentOn Saturday, Sept. 13, at 12:21 p.m., Oro Valley police responded to a house on the 9000 block of N. Calle Loma Linda after receiving a call about a violation of a court order. The woman told police that her son had come to her house and damaged her garage door. The son and his wife had recently moved out, but left some of their belongings at the house. The woman left the items outside and told the two to come pick up their items. After month, the rain ruined the items because they were left outside. The son and his mother got into a verbal argument, left and hit her garage door with a shovel. She said it would cost about $500 to repair the door.  On Monday, Sept. 8, at about 7:50 a.m., an Oro Valley police officer working as student resource officer at Canyon Del Oro High School responded to a fight that had recently occurred between two female students. A verbal argument took place between two students after one student was accused of writing on the other student’s cellphone case. The two exchanged words and separated, and then a short while later one student returned, threw her backpack on the ground and struck the other student in the head. The two exchanged strikes, hair pulling and kicking in front of about 10 to 20 students until a teacher broke up the fight. One student was arrested for disorderly conduct and the other was arrested for assault. Both were released to their respective parents and suspended for three days. On Sunday, Sept. 7, at about 3:39 p.m., Oro Valley police responded to a report of shoplifting at the Kohl’s at 7785 N. Oracle Road. The shoplifting was taking place when police arrived. On security cameras, police watched as the man made his way around the store concealing items on his person and in his backpack. After detaining and questioning the man, police found $290.98 worth of stolen merchandise on him. He had also broken a watch by trying to remove the security tag. He was arrested for shoplifting and criminal damage and transported to the Pima County Jail.

  • Golder Ranch Fire opens new facility

    Last week, the Golder Ranch Fire District hosted a special ceremony to celebrate the new fire facility in a partnership between Robson Communities and Golder Ranch Fire District. This collaborative effort is what made the station the community possible.

  • Children’s Museum to come to Oro Valley

    Families of Oro Valley will soon be able to enjoy a fun, interactive and hands-on learning space for their children as the town is looking to open a Children’s Museum in the first quarter of 2015.The town is partnering with Children’s Museum Tucson who opened its doors in 1986 and receives about 162,000 visitors per year. The museum, which caters to children zero to 10 years old, educates through hands-on learning activities. “Mr. Rogers said something along the lines of “play is the job of childhood.” I believe this is how children grow and develop and experience the world – through leaning and play,” said Michael Luria, executive director of Children’s Museum Tucson. “The museum is also an opportunity for quality family time.”Mayor Satish Hiremath visited Children’s Museum Tucson about a year ago where he expressed interest in bringing something like it to Oro Valley. The conversation continued in the coming months and in time the idea was brought before the Children’s Museum Tucson board. After conducting research studies on the effects of another museum and the pros and cons involved, the Tucson museum decided to move forward with the project.“We wanted to ask ourselves if having another museum made sense, because we didn’t want to be cannibalizing ourselves downtown,” said Luria. “We did research with member in Oro Valley, Sahuarita and Green Valley to help.”The initial cost of the project is $600,000. The Children’s Museum Tucson will contribute $200,000 and the town has budgeted a one-time $200,000 amount along with a yearly subsidy of $75,000 for maintaining the museum. The town approved the amounts in May of this year. The remaining costs for the project will be fundraised by the town. 

  • Storytelling with Gourds and Silver

    An Oro Valley couple gathers traditions from many ancient media.One of the best painters of the American West says, “I’m a storyteller.”   And thinking of his audience, he adds, “Maybe they’ll understand the story or inject their own interpretation.”Enter Carmelita and Darrell Martin, who are also storytellers, but storytellers who use neither words nor oil on canvas.  Carmelita uses gourds, and Darrell uses silver. You can meet Carmelita and Darrell at the Sun City Oro Valley Arts and Crafts Festival in Oro Valley on Saturday, Oct.  25. At the festival you can enjoy the challenge of interpreting the stories embedded in Darrell and Carmelita’s work—and you can be creative in making and injecting your own interpretations. That’s a great feature of an arts and crafts festival, the opportunity to interact with the participants and their stories. If a piece of Darrell’s jewelry resonates with a story you like, then you go home with a new piece of wearable art. If one of Carmelita’s gourds reminds you of a story from your life, you can enhance your home with this reminder.Decorated gourds go back some 4,000 years in Peru.  And both Europe and Asia have long histories of artists working in silver and other metals. Many gourd artists like the way this medium pulls in the world of nature, with its beauty of shape and line, plus its variability and unpredictability. Every gourd is unique, nature’s guarantee of originality.Carmelita had painted some gourds she had grown, but she says she didn’t find the                           process too satisfying.  She then began to add traditional techniques like burning and carving designs onto the gourds. The carving led to inlays, which then led to adding objects such as beads.  

Oro Valley Audiology

Oro Valley AudiologyAddress: 2542 E Vistoso Commerce Loop Rd, Oro Valley, AZ 85755Phone:(520) ...

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